Engaging Millennial Givers

As the proud father of two young adults, I might have a slightly biased opinion, but I think Millennials, people born between 1981 and 1998, have gotten a bad rap. Now the largest living generation, Millennials have been pegged as entitled, lazy, insubordinate, selfish coffee snobs whose face-to-face social skills have been completely wrecked by texting and social media.

Millennial drinking coffee

While there’s at least a drop of truth in that description—as is the case with most stereotypes—I’d like to suggest an alternate descriptor: Millennials are misunderstood. And that’s particularly the case when it comes to the idea that they’re selfish. The truth is, Millennials are exceptionally generous with both their time and financial resources. Dollar for dollar, they may not be giving “as much” as older generations; however, as a percentage of total income, their giving is on par with that of Baby Boomers.

“But Rusty,” you might be thinking, “My church is full of Millennials, and they’re not giving.” First of all, congratulations on having a church full of Millennials. Given that 32% of adults under age 30 have no religious affiliation, you must be doing many things well. And my guess is the Millennials at your church are giving—somewhere else. If they aren’t yet contributing financially to your church, that may say less about them, as Millennials, than it does about your church’s generosity culture.

Accelerating Year-End Giving at Your Church

Did October sneak up on you, too? It seems like just yesterday you were powering through Vacation Bible School, and now—suddenly—it’s only 10 weeks until Christmas. (Did your blood pressure go up a bit just now?)

Year-End Giving Guide

Along with the stress of planning for the Christmas season, many church leaders feel some anxiety about what comes after Christmas: the end of the fiscal year. There isn’t much time left to meet projected budgets. How will you leverage the remaining weeks of 2017 to accelerate generosity in your church?

Year-End Giving Guide

Encouraging People on their Generosity Journey

The idea of a “giving pathway” isn’t a new concept. We’ve talked about the Next Steps of Generosity before, and I have shared a generous giver’s prayer. But what if we stopped thinking about this journey of generosity so much in terms of percentages and numbers?

Giving PathwayFirst – why is a pathway important? For the same reason you likely have a formal assimilation program in your church – you desire to move people from where they are, to where you (and God) want them to be. You have developed a logical “next steps” process – for example:

If you’re a first-time guest with us this weekend, we invite you to our monthly “Open Mic” night – come and learn anything you’d like to know about our church, mission, and ministries. At Open Mic night, you talk about their next step – attending your New Member class. Then in the New Member class, you talk about the importance of getting plugged in – take a spiritual gifts assessment, and get involved in a small group. Once engaged in the church and involved in a small group, you work to get them serving in a ministry area that aligns with their gift assessment. And so on. There is a logical, and easy-to-understand series of steps that helps the worship guest know how to engage with you and the church.

A similar process is wise in your giving discipleship program:

  • Non-givers need help understanding what their first step might be. “I’ve never giving before – where do I start? How much am I supposed to give? How/where do I give?” These may seem like easy questions for you, but consider the new believer who wasn’t raised in the church. Don’t assume even the most basic of questions – anticipate and answer them all.
  • Casual givers need a nudge to become a consistent giver.
  • Those who are tithing often believe they’ve “arrived” – that there is no next step for them. They believe they are right where God commands them, without considering that there is room for them to grow in their personal journey. We know that to be wrong, don’t we? Isn’t God always challenging us to grow with him in ALL areas of discipleship? Prayer, Bible study, service, giving, sharing the Gospel. A pathway helps to understand that we are always challenged to grow in our giving.

Often a giving pathway (or “Generosity Ladder” as first coined by Nelson Searcy in his book by the same name), is somewhat organized by gift amounts or income percentages. The first level is initial giver, while a higher level represents a tithe, and a still higher level represents an amount above the tithe. Well…can’t an initial giver begin giving at the level of a tithe? Do we have to wait until a higher step to reach that amount?

Today I want to challenge you to consider this pathway from a new perspective. Let’s look at this concept in terms of behavior. Rather than defining each step by an amount given, or a percentage of income, let’s define each step with a new behavior. How can we define each step in the pathway by a new behavior?

Let’s start at the beginning – with someone giving for the very first time.

An Initial Giver is someone who decides to give for the first time; someone who decides to give something and trust God and the leaders of the Church with this gift (2 Corinthians 8:7; 15). Before doing so, there are five things a first-time giver will likely need to know before they will give. These five things educate them, reassure them, and provide logistical information to empower them to give for the very first time. And as church leaders, that’s our job – to empower our people in spiritual growth. The new behavior – practicing generosity through a tangible act of giving.

New Year-End Giving Guide Now Available

With fewer than 100 days left in the year, you may find yourself wondering how you can encourage your people to “finish strong” this year in terms of generosity. Now is the perfect time to be asking yourself that question.

Mobile Giving

The most immediate benefit of a year-end giving project is, of course, increased giving. And we can all celebrate that result. But planning a strong year-end giving initiative with care and excellence will yield far greater results. Let’s take a look:

1. It prompts spiritual growth.
Growth in the area of generosity is a journey. Each time you broach the subject, you encourage people to take a step on the giving pathway. You encourage people to adjust their thinking and behavior patterns to align more closely with their faith. This time of year provides an excellent opportunity to raise this topic once again.

2. It normalizes the conversation.
Many church leaders are hesitant to talk about money. And your people don’t want to hear about money either – so it’s avoided completely. While most feel this avoidance solves the problem, it actually helps to ensure a negative outcome. As pastors, avoidance is simply not your friend. We need to do all we can to normalize the conversation, and an emphasis on year-end giving will help you do just that.

3. It provides an opportunity to talk about mission and vision.
An annual vision weekend or generosity series rarely creates any long-term traction in the lives of your donor base. Donors want to play a part in the larger story. It’s your job to show them how. It is critical that you take every possible opportunity to discuss, in a meaningful way, the church’s mission and vision and the role generosity plays in supporting the ongoing ministry of the church. Connecting the dots between generosity and ministry will help your people see how their giving truly makes a difference.

Year-End Giving GuideTo help you in your mission to encourage generosity, the Generis team has created a new e-book called “The Year-End Giving Guide” available as a free download for you.

This resource serves as a pathway to design and implement an excellent year-end giving project that will leave you excited and prepared.

In addition to several practical helps throughout this newly updated 42-page resource, this e-book will also:

  • position your church as the best year-end giving option
  • help you create a natural on-ramp for first-time givers
  • list the 10 elements of a year-end giving project
  • deliver a sample impact report
  • and much more!

Download your copy today, and encourage year-end generosity in your church in a way that will provide results that surpasses increased giving, but reaches the hearts of your people.

DOWNLOAD NOW

Generis Continues Growing Generous Hearts with New Website

How do you grow generous hearts? As a pastor you’ve probably asked yourself (and your other pastor friends) that very question. How do you accelerate generosity in your church? How do you help people take the next step in their giving journey? How do you encourage your people to live radically generous lives?

Generis website

You’re not alone. The team at Generis is asking those same questions, and with more than 600 years of combined ministry and consulting experience on the team, we have a few answers to share.

With the launch of the new Generis website, you can find some of those answers while our team continues growing generous hearts toward God-inspired vision.

You Asked for It – Encouraging Generosity Outside the Offering Moment

Late last year I reached out to more than 500 church leaders across the country with a survey on the topic of generosity. At the end of the survey, I offered an opportunity for respondents to ask me any questions they had on the topic.

You Asked for ItI must say, you and your fellow church leaders posed some great questions. Thank you! (In fact, one of the most common questions has started developing into an e-book I’m eager to get into your hands soon, so stay tuned for more on that!)

But first, I’m excited to start answering these questions one by one with a string of blog posts in a “You Asked For It” series. Today’s question was one raised by several respondents, so I figure that’s a good place to start.

Q: How can we include generosity as a regular element in worship beyond the weekly offering?

The Next Steps of Generosity

In a recent debrief with the senior pastor and generosity team of a current church client, we spent time reviewing the just concluded public phase of their recent initiative. (I always value this conversation with my clients - What did we learn? What worked? What didn’t? What should we change next time? It’s most helpful to get that information while it’s still fresh in everyone’s mind.)

giving pathwayThe most significant takeaway for the pastor in this instance was a tool we implemented together to help establish some “generosity next steps” language the church can continue using from this point forward.

I’ve written about the concept before. We’ve discussed creating on ramps to the giving path, the discipleship path of generosity, and even a prayer journey of generosity. It’s a good idea to check back on these posts to regain a big picture perspective when you review your church’s process.

NEXT STEPS PROCESS…
This particular church has an extremely clear (and very effective) next steps philosophy for the assimilation of new people. They are brilliant at this implementation (as is reflected by their appearance on Outreach Magazine’s Fastest-Growing Churches list).

Lack of Vision Reflected in (Lost) Giving

It has been an amazing few months in my ministry with Generis. God has allowed me to witness several magnificently extravagant gifts as part of accelerated giving initiatives where I’ve been blessed to participate as consultant and partner to my church clients.

church vision

I’ve seen individuals and families make commitments of $500,000, $1,000,000, $1,500,000, $2,000,000 and $3,000,000!

It is amazing to see God move in the hearts of those He has blessed financially to make huge differences in Kingdom initiatives for church ministry, local outreach, and national and international missions efforts.

Discipleship Path of Generosity – Part Two – The Prayer Journey

In the spring of 2011, Andrea and I had reached giving goals that we had set for ourselves the year before. We were feeling great that God had so blessed us that we were able to give at levels we had never attained before.

discipleship of generosity

Having given beyond the tithe for years, this marked a new level of generosity for us. And, to top it off, these goals were reached during the same year our youngest entered college.

Now we were paying the expenses for two to be in full-time higher education, and yet, giving at never-before-seen levels! Thank you, God.